597 Posts

Recently, I was having a conversation with a gentleman and he seemed disinterested. I tried not to take things too personally, but I thought maybe he didn’t like me, or maybe he was just not very friendly. It turns out, this gentleman suffered from hearing loss, and he had not taken any steps to fix his hearing. I wondered to myself: how many people literally suffer in silence because they don’t know about the advancements in audiology, or because they are afraid a cumbersome hearing aid will make them look older?

Today, hearing aids are smaller, more powerful and less expensive than ever before. Loss of hearing affects millions of Americans and hearing aids are the best way to correct hearing loss for the majority of these people. Hearing aids are not just for your grandfather! A hearing device can help anyone needing additional assistance with their auditory range.

There are two standard types of hearing aid devices: the in the ear models called (ITE) and the behind the ear models, called (BTE). Each of these models has several different sizes ranging from almost imperceptible to large, depending upon what the patient needs. A doctor will help you determine the correct aid for your particular situation.

hearing aidThe smallest hearing aids made are called Invisible in the Canal and Completely in the Canal aids. The fit snugly into the ear canal and are designed for people with minimal hearing loss. These are a great option for folks who want their hearing aid to be virtually invisible. In the Canal hearing devices are placed on the lower part of the outer ear bowl and they are very comfortable and easy to use for the wearer. Since this type of mechanism is larger than the Invisible in the Canal and the Completely in the Canal styles, they have a longer battery life and are a great option for people with all types of hearing loss. Larger devices, known as low profile hearing aids, come in the half shell designs to devices that almost fill the entire outer ear bowl. These types of appliances are excellent for people with limited dexterity, since they are easier to handle. Many of these kinds of hearing aids are large enough to have microphone and volume controls to accommodate the wearer.

Behind the ear devices have not been too popular over the years because they used to be so obvious, but today, these appliances have thin ear tubes and ear tips, making them almost undetectable! These types of hearing aids are gaining a resurgence in popularity due to their sleek cosmetic look, long battery life, and their ease of use. There are several BTE devices to choose from, including the Mini BTE, made with the ultimate discretion in mind; the receiver in the ear or receiver in the canal aids which have speakers built into the ear tip; and the traditional BTE OKC hearing aids with ear molds, constructed for any type of hearing loss, from mild to extreme loss.

Not sure which hearing aid is right for you? Keep in mind that all digital hearing devices have at least one microphone to gather sound, an embedded computer chip to amplify the sound and a speaker portion to send signals to your ear, as well as a battery to make the aid function properly. When you meet with your audiologist or regular doctor, they will take into consideration your level of hearing loss, your budget and your lifestyle. Since there are many hearing aid manufacturers and new innovations are being made almost daily, speak to your hearing care professional about the products available and then have them make recommendations regarding the best device for you.

Once the selection has been made regarding the type of hearing aid that best suits you, you will need a professional fitting and programing by an expert in the field. In addition to the consideration given to your budget and needs, attention will be given to your hobbies, your career and your cosmetic preferences. If you are not particularly tech-savvy, that might play into the hearing aid selection by your audiologist. In addition, your doctor or hearing professional will also consider any other physical limitations you may have, including your dexterity. These factors will make your new device comfortable and user friendly. The most important part of this consultation will be the setting for your new hearing aid; an audiologist or hearing specialist can precisely adjust your device to the frequencies needed to help you hear what you have been missing!

Once you have been fitted with your new hearing device, recognize there will be an adjustment period. It may take some getting used to, even if you have worn a hearing aid in the past. Make sure to ask your audiologist or specialist for instructions and advisement when breaking in your new mechanisms.

Some of the most recent advancements in hearing aid technology is the use of wireless electronic components. With this innovation, two hearing aids can work in conjunction with one another as one complete system. Wireless systems also let the person wearing the hearing aid to customize and program the devices to their specifications. Another great aspect of the wireless hearing aid—it can connect with MP3 players, computers, televisions and even mobile phones.

Now that you have gone through the process of determining your level of hearing loss, you have discussed the various options with a professional and have decided on a model, what will it cost you? The amount depends upon the features, size and the level of customization, but you can expect to spend anywhere from $1000.00 to $4000.00 per ear piece. You can find discounts, depending upon affiliations you may have, but generally, hearing devices are not covered by insurance. You can find financing to make them affordable, however.

A hearing aid can drastically compliment your quality of life. The subtle sounds of nature, the dialogue of a movie, even a conversation with a loved one will be enhanced. With the strives in technology, hearing never sounded so good! Here is a map direction to the nearest hearing aids near me (where I live). They have Norman and Moore locations as well.

Watch Video

Khartoum, Sudan — Amal is 11 years old and seeking a divorce.

The young Sudanese girl was in elementary school when a 38-year-old man asked for her hand in marriage.

Her father accepted the proposal, and Amal (not her real name) was immediately wed.

In Sudan, child marriage has been woven into the fabric of the country’s culture, driven by tradition and poverty. More than a third of girls there are married before their 18th birthday, according to a 2017 UNICEF report, and 12% are wed before they reach 15. Under the country’s 1991 Personal Status Law of Muslims, children can marry when they reach “maturity,” which is only 10 years old. It’s the lowest legal age of marriage in Africa.

Noura in her own words: Teen who killed rapist husband shares her story

The recent case of Sudanese teenager Noura Hussein, sentenced to death earlier this year for killing her husband as he tried to rape her, has focused attention on child marriage in Sudan. Now 19, Noura was just 15 when she was forced to marry a man more than twice her age.

Pre-teen bride Amal says she was repeatedly abused at the hands of her husband, who smoked cigarettes as he beat her.

In an interview in Khartoum, her father sitting beside her, Amal told CNN that her husband had another wife who lived in the same house with them.

After the abuse, Amal said that she went to her father for help, but he kept sending her back. Eventually she escaped with the aid of her husband’s first wife.

“He treated me horribly,” Amal said of her husband. “Then when the beatings became every day, I went to the police station.”

A doctor who evaluated Amal’s injuries at the station found evidence that she’d been tied up and assaulted.

Though he had heard her story before, Amal’s father wept while his daughter talked to us.

“Twice, she came to my home, twice, and was terrified and frightened. I sent her back,” he told CNN. “I am regretful.”

Amal’s father, who works as a tinsmith laborer in the street, is raising six daughters on his own. When he described why he married Amal off — despite her young age — he cited tradition and honor.

“When I let him marry my daughter, it was on trust, on the basis that he would look after her, let her continue with her education and honor her as agreed,” he said. “But I found that this was not happening. It was all beating, humiliation and provocation.”

Many Sudanese parents marry off their daughters in hopes of avoiding poverty, violence or family shame. Unmarried women are often stigmatized as agir, “infertile,” or bayra, “not demanded for marriage.” But, in reality, child brides are more likely to face sexual, physical and psychological violence, according to UNICEF.

“I didn’t know that getting married at a young age could have such consequences,” Amal’s father added.

Despite what happened to Amal, he says it won’t stop him from marrying off his younger daughters.

In December 2015, the Sudanese government joined the African Union campaign to end child marriage on the continent. One year later, Sudan received recommendations from the United Nations with the same goal.

In the intervening years, Sudan’s National Council for Child Welfare (NCCW) formulated a strategy for abandoning the practice, but the reform sparked counter-mobilization by conservative religious groups in the country and little has been done to implement it.

The SEEMA Center, a nongovernmental organization working with victims and survivors of gender-based violence in Khartoum, is among civil-society groups working to change that.

Nahid Jabralla, director of SEEMA, has been campaigning in support of Amal, Noura and other young women and girls with stories like theirs.

“Many of the cases brought to SEEMA Center are related to forced marriage, child marriage or domestic violence, including marital rape and cases to do with injustice,” Jabralla told CNN. “However, what is brought to SEEMA Center is a very small portion of the cases of the violations that women and children are subjected to in the Sudan.”

Read more: In Sudan, the #JusticeForNoura campaign gave a voice to the voiceless

The Sudanese government has not responded to CNN’s requests for comment on child marriage in the country, or Noura’s case.

While official statistics show that 34% of girls in Sudan get married before they reach 18, this varies significantly across the country. In Sudan’s East Darfur State, for example, 57% of women marry before the age of 18, according to a 2014 UNICEF health survey.

Sudan is full of Nouras and few have seen justice, Jabralla says.

Despite these odds, young girls like Amal are still fighting for a different future.

The 11-year-old, who likes to play with dolls and has filled countless notebooks with poetry, is adamant on having her divorce finalized.

As soon as it is, she wants to get back to school, to be reunited with her friends.

Asked what advice she would give other young girls fighting early marriage, Amal looked down at her hands.

“Be brave,” she said.

“I wish I was braver.”

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — The ailing father of designer Kate Spade died just hours before his daughter’s funeral in Kansas City, Missouri.

An announcement was made Thursday at Spade’s funeral, according to WDAF. A priest at the service said Earl (Frank) Brosnahan Jr. was recently put into hospice and passed away Wednesday night. He was 89 years old.

“He had been in failing health of late and was heartbroken over the recent death of his beloved daughter,” a family statement says. Read the full statement from family below.

Brosnahan was born in Kansas City and lived most of his life there, according to his family. He was surrounded by family in his home when he died Wednesday.

Spade, whose real name was Katherine Noel Brosnahan, took her own life earlier this month. She was found dead in her New York City apartment on June 5. Her husband said she suffered from depression for years.

Spade’s funeral is taking place this afternoon at Redemptorist Church in Kansas City.

Here is the full statement from the Brosnahan family:

“We are deeply saddened to announce that Katy’s father, Earl F. Brosnahan Jr., passed away last night at age 89. He had been in failing health of late and was heartbroken over the recent death of his beloved daughter. He was at home and surrounded by family at the time of his passing.

Frank was born in Kansas City, Mo. and was a lifelong resident. He served in the U.S. Navy before graduating from the University of Miami in 1949, after which he returned to Kansas City to work in the family construction business. He was president of the Midwest Heavy Construction Association in the mid 1960s after taking over the family business fro his father Earl F. Brosnahan Sr. and his mother Helen Rose Brosnahan (nee Mottin).

Frank married June Therese Mullen in 1953 and had six children, Missy, Earl III, Ann, Reta, Katy (decesed) and Eve. He was an avid tennis player and a charter member of the Carriage Club in Kansas City for more than 50 years. Frank married Sandy Palmer in 1992 and she was at his bedside when he passed.

Later in life Frank took up golf and was a great lover of his two Yorkshire Terriers. He was especially proud of his wife, children and grandchildren. Frank is survived by his wife Sandy, three brothers and a sister, five children, eight grandchildren and numerous nieces and nephews. He is preceded in death by his parents, sisters Katherine and Helen De Salme and his daughter Katherine Noel.”

If you are having suicidal thoughts there are people who want to help. Please go to a hospital, call 911 or call the National Suicide Hotline at 1-800-SUICIDE (1-800-784-2433).

GREECE – A 9-year-old boy in Greece permanently injured his left eye when he repeatedly gazed into a laser pointer’s green beam, doctors say.

Examination revealed a large hole in the macula, a small area in the retina that helps with discerning detail in faces and while reading or driving, the doctors said in a case report published Wednesday in the New England Journal of Medicine. Further imaging revealed two more injured areas below the macular hole.

Macular holes are typically treated with surgery that is accompanied with an almost 100% risk of cataract formation, Dr. Sofia Androudi, a physician involved with the case, wrote in an email. Cataracts cause blurry vision by clouding the eyes’ clear lenses.

However, in this case, because the macular hole resulted from the laser burn, the nerves in the eye that absorb light were totally damaged, said Androudi, an assistant professor of ophthalmology at the University of Thessaly in Greece. “This means that even if the surgery would be successful, the boy would not be able to see.”

The boy’s vision was measured at 20/20 in his right eye and 20/100 in his left, according to the report. A person with a visual acuity of 20/100 would have to be within 20 feet of a point of focus in order to see what a person with normal vision can see at 100 feet.

Children are often reluctant to report eye injuries or symptoms, Androudi said, and she suspected that the patient had injured his eye at least a year before coming in for treatment. But even if he had come in earlier, there was no available therapy for his case, she said. Eighteen months after he came in, there were no changes to the boy’s vision.

“When you have something as powerful like a laser, it’s so powerful that it is converted to heat like a burn,” said Dr. Thomas C. Lee, director of the Vision Center at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, who was not involved with the care of this patient. “That can leave scar tissue behind and can cause bleeding. The patient can actually get a blind spot right in the middle of the eye. … It’s like a magnifying glass burning a piece of paper. It’s the same thing.”

The United States Food and Drug Administration restricts the sale of laser pointers with more than 5 milliwatts of power throughout the US. However, the restrictions are not enforced or regulated and pointers are very easy to purchase online, Androudi said.

“Typically, they’re less than 5 milliwatts, and those are relatively less harmful, but they’re often mislabeled. The power output, rather than being 5 milliwatts, can be 10, 50 or even higher,” said Dr. Peter Gehlbach, director of the Wilmer Echography Center and professor of ophthalmology at the Johns Hopkins Wilmer Eye Institute, who was not involved in this patient’s care. “And these are particularly dangerous powers, and there’s no way for you to know as a user that this laser pointer that you got off the internet has the right power.”

The patient’s father had bought the laser as a toy from a street merchant, Androudi said. Green-blue lasers are typically considered more dangerous than red-orange lasers because they emit a light that is very close to 550 nanometers, the wavelength to which the human eye is most sensitive. Put simply, it’s easier to see green light than red, she explained.

Although awareness about the dangers that lasers can pose has increased, experts recommend that parents who use laser pointers for work should keep them away from their children. That means no playing with them like they’re light sabers or aiming them in front of cats to get them to chase the little dot.

“Fundamentally, lasers should never be considered toys,” Lee said.

JOHNSTON, Iowa  —  Johnston Police are looking for a 60-year-old man whose been missing since Wednesday afternoon.

Jeffrey Lynn Dreesen was as last seen at 3:00pm at 6005 Breemen Court in Johnston.  He was wearing a blue jeans and a red/yellow jacket.

If you’ve seen Mr. Dreesen you’re asked to call Johnston Police Department at 515-278-2345.

NEWTON, Iowa  —  Officers are used to being called to the scene after a crash happens, but on Tuesday they got to watch live as crashes took place in front of them.

The Iowa State Patrol hosted a live crash event at the Iowa Speedway. Thirteen motorcycles and seven other vehicles were crashed into each other and into walls. Along with law enforcement officers, there were doctors, insurance adjusters, and attorneys on hand to see what really happens in a crash.

Channel 13 photojournalist Randy Schumacher was at the event and captured footage that can be seen in the video above.

MARSHALLTOWN, Iowa  —  Iowa Citizens for Community Improvement held a teach-out called Keeping ICE Out of Iowa: Deportation Defense Discussion in Marshalltown on Tuesday.

Marshalltown’s population is 20% percent Latino, and the goal of the meeting was to teach that community about their rights, protest President Trump’s “zero tolerance” initiative, and speak out against Senate File 481, which passed last legislative session. The bill requires all local law enforcement agencies to act as ICE agents and comply with detainer requests. These allow a sheriff to hold a suspected illegal immigrant for 48 hours after a scheduled release.

Prescila Martinez is a immigration rights advocate from Texas, and she said this is unconstitutional.

“With detaining family members, our goals with immigrant rights is to decriminalize. We don’t need that many people in jail, especially those who are not violent criminals,” she said.

As it stands now, the law goes into effect on July 1st, 2018. Supporters say it keeps the community safe while upholding the law.

Marshalltown resident Mike Fitz disagrees.

“I think it’s disgusting and un-American. If I wanted to live in Nazi Germany, I would go back 70 years and live there,” he said.

House Republican Steven Holtz backed the bill. Channel 13 reached out to him for comment, but had not heard back at the time of publication.

A similar CCI event will be held in Des Moines on Thursday. Click here for more information.

POLK COUNTY, Iowa  —  The Polk County Board of Supervisors will meet on Tuesday for the first time since a Des Moines Register investigation was published, revealing the county gave hundreds of thousands of dollars to religious schools.

According to the Register’s investigation, the board approved grants totaling $844,000 to a one-man corporation in 2011 and 2012. The corporation then spent all the funds at Christian schools. The money came from Prairie Meadows profits. The Register says state and county laws prohibit spending that money on private schools.

Supervisor John Mauro pushed for the grants that went to the private schools. He lost a primary earlier this month and his term will end in January.

Watch Video

YUMA, Ariz. – A 23-year-old Walmart shopper is accused of making fraudulent returns at more than 1,000 of the chain’s stores across the country.

Thomas Frudaker was arrested Wednesday. Officials said he made $1.3 million worth of fraudulent returns at Walmart stores.

Suspicion arose when Frudaker attempted to return a computer at a Walmart in Yuma, Arizona, officials said. The store reported it appeared he had taken parts out of the machine before making the return.

According to CNN affiliate KSWT, the Yuma Police Department said it found Frudaker had committed similar fraudulent returns at more than 1,000 Walmarts over 18 months.

Frudaker faces six felony charges, including two counts of theft, two counts of fraudulent schemes and two counts of criminal damage.

His bond has been set at $40,000.

Portsmouth, Iowa calls itself the Biggest Little Town in the USA. It also has some of the nicest people.

Michael Admire has the story of Jaxon Rold, a kid who loves baseball, and a community who loves him.

They are all #JAXONSTRONG.

In this week’s What’s Bugging Andy, Andy Fales says Cyclone and Hawkeye fans should be just as upset about the end of the Hy-Vee Classic as Panther and Bulldog fans are.